Category: news2

How we move forward

by Laura Gildart Sauter I’ve been a fan of the Salem Progressive Film Series for some time.  The monthly films are always thought-provoking and informative, and discuss issues that should be important to any concerned citizen.  However, this month’s award-winning offering, Bikes vs. Cars (90min), directed by Fredrik Gertten, produced by Margarete Jangard and Elin Kamlert, is particularly relevant to the City of Salem and many of its current issues: the disagreement over the construction of a third bridge, the controversy over downtown parking, the need for expanded bus service, and the movement to reverse the one-way street grid. ...

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May 1 march in Salem

Photos and story by Jason Cox Hundreds of progressive Oregonians marched on the Oregon State Capitol on Sunday, May 1, with a timely theme of “Today We March, Tomorrow We Vote!” Numerous allied groups found common cause in speaking up for workers’ rights, keeping families together and speaking up against hate. Causa Oregon and the Oregon School Employees Association organized the...

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Election Day May 17, Get that ballot IN, Why May Matters

Get that ballot IN Marion County ballots are being mailed this week. Mark yours and turn it in as soon as possible. Why? – You won’t get phone calls. Elections officials keep track of who has turned in their ballot (though not what your vote was). That information appears in online databases. Candidates and their volunteers can see if you’ve voted. They often call tardy voters to get their ballot in. You can avoid the hassle if you mail your ballot in early. – You won’t have to find a drop box to drop your ballot by hand. Ballot drop box locations are printed on pages 4 and 5 of the Marion County Voter Pamphlet. But stamps are 47 cents now. Avoid the drive, the gas and the traffic! Mail your ballot immediately. Election Day May 17 Mail by May 10 “If you don’t mail before May 10, you are taking a chance,” says Bill Burgess, Marion County Clerk. Salem mail – even mail destined for Salem – is now routed up through Portland. This can delay mail delivery times back in Salem. For this reason, Burgess and other Marion County election officials are urging voters who want to mail their ballots to post it by May 10 – ONE FULL WEEK before election day. “We’ve seen time and again, that a few ballots don’t make it in time....

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What Salem people say

We recently asked Salem residents on Liberty Street and in South Salem if they knew who Salem’s mayor was, and if they knew who was running in May to replace her. We also wondered what issues they hoped the city would prioritize after the election. We were surprised that so many younger people were unaware of the name of their city’s top elected official, or candidates who have been running to take her job. We enjoyed the range of good ideas Salem people have as the city moves forward.                              ...

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Little school, big politics -Willamette students speak out

If you want to hear firebrand political ideas, what better place to start than at the local college? As this year’s election season kicks into gear, the students of Willamette University have thrown themselves into the national political conversation. There is a diversity of political opinion at the school that makes itself known in nearly every political conversation. Salem Weekly sat down with students to hear more about their political thoughts and engagement. The majority of students appear to support Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, while supporters of former Sec. of State Hillary Clinton number slightly fewer but are just as vocal. While the reasons students support each candidate are diverse, many students’ opinions reflect broader conversations being had around the Clinton and Sanders campaigns. For Sanders supporters, one of the main issues students consistently raised was a wariness of establishment politics. To Sam Hilburn, class of 2016, Clinton represents a deepening of existing problems seen in the status quo, particularly income inequality. Senior Shamir Cervantes, the recently-resigned student body president, elaborates on the belief that Sander is more likely to listen to outsider perspectives, pointing to issues like foreign policy. Although Cervantes cannot vote due to his status as a non-citizen legal resident, he articulates an ardent support of Senator Sanders. When asked why he believes Sanders espouses a better position on foreign policy than the experienced Sec....

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