Category: news2

Election Day May 17, Get that ballot IN, Why May Matters

Get that ballot IN Marion County ballots are being mailed this week. Mark yours and turn it in as soon as possible. Why? – You won’t get phone calls. Elections officials keep track of who has turned in their ballot (though not what your vote was). That information appears in online databases. Candidates and their volunteers can see if you’ve voted. They often call tardy voters to get their ballot in. You can avoid the hassle if you mail your ballot in early. – You won’t have to find a drop box to drop your ballot by hand. Ballot drop box locations are printed on pages 4 and 5 of the Marion County Voter Pamphlet. But stamps are 47 cents now. Avoid the drive, the gas and the traffic! Mail your ballot immediately. Election Day May 17 Mail by May 10 “If you don’t mail before May 10, you are taking a chance,” says Bill Burgess, Marion County Clerk. Salem mail – even mail destined for Salem – is now routed up through Portland. This can delay mail delivery times back in Salem. For this reason, Burgess and other Marion County election officials are urging voters who want to mail their ballots to post it by May 10 – ONE FULL WEEK before election day. “We’ve seen time and again, that a few ballots don’t make it in time....

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What Salem people say

We recently asked Salem residents on Liberty Street and in South Salem if they knew who Salem’s mayor was, and if they knew who was running in May to replace her. We also wondered what issues they hoped the city would prioritize after the election. We were surprised that so many younger people were unaware of the name of their city’s top elected official, or candidates who have been running to take her job. We enjoyed the range of good ideas Salem people have as the city moves forward.                              ...

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Little school, big politics -Willamette students speak out

If you want to hear firebrand political ideas, what better place to start than at the local college? As this year’s election season kicks into gear, the students of Willamette University have thrown themselves into the national political conversation. There is a diversity of political opinion at the school that makes itself known in nearly every political conversation. Salem Weekly sat down with students to hear more about their political thoughts and engagement. The majority of students appear to support Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, while supporters of former Sec. of State Hillary Clinton number slightly fewer but are just as vocal. While the reasons students support each candidate are diverse, many students’ opinions reflect broader conversations being had around the Clinton and Sanders campaigns. For Sanders supporters, one of the main issues students consistently raised was a wariness of establishment politics. To Sam Hilburn, class of 2016, Clinton represents a deepening of existing problems seen in the status quo, particularly income inequality. Senior Shamir Cervantes, the recently-resigned student body president, elaborates on the belief that Sander is more likely to listen to outsider perspectives, pointing to issues like foreign policy. Although Cervantes cannot vote due to his status as a non-citizen legal resident, he articulates an ardent support of Senator Sanders. When asked why he believes Sanders espouses a better position on foreign policy than the experienced Sec....

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Salem PACs -local money influences election

by Helen Caswell Political Action Committees (PACs) have existed in the United States since 1944, but have not come to the attention of most Americans until recently, when issues of campaign finance became central to public conversation. Here in Salem, they are a factor in local elections. Typically representing labor, business, trade union or ideological interests, PACs raise and spend funds to elect – or defeat – candidates for public office, ballot initiatives or legislation. Each PAC is allowed to give up to $5,000 to a candidate per election (primary and general elections are counted separately) up to $5,000...

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Disposable fast fashion and who it hurts

by Helen Caswell “The True Cost” of the cheap clothes sold at Salem retailers like Walmart, Target and Forever 21, says this documentary coming to the Salem Progressive Film Series, [is human misery and environmental degradation.] Shot in crowded garment factories in Third World countries and peppered with ads, old documentaries, vintage fashion images and news clips, the film discusses the changing way garments are sold in the United States and Europe. The price of clothing in our country has decreased markedly in the last few decades, and that has to do with where it’s made. In the 1960s,...

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