Category: news2

Where have all the products gone?

Have you been to your favorite cannabis store lately to find that your favorite cannabis product is out of stock?  Well, you are not alone. Many cannabis consumers, especially medical patients, have been seriously challenged to find the products they have come to rely on. The reason is that the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Oregon Health Authority initiated new rules on October 1st for marijuana testing, labeling, and packaging, that have thrown our new industry into a tailspin and an industry wide crisis. Although most cannabis business owners support testing that provides safe cannabis, some of the recent changes were overly onerous. What used to cost $100 for lab conducted potency and purity test, can now run into the thousands. Many business owners have been unable to get their product into labs for testing, even once they negotiate the new fees. To date the OLCC has only 4 fully licensed labs. This low number of labs available simply doesn’t meet the demand of the new market. Some businesses, unable to plan for such unforeseen obstacles, are in serious trouble. May processors have a warehouse full of product that hasn’t been able to be moved to market due to this bottlenecking at the labs. Some have already opted to forego moving forward into the  legal recreational market, while others have hunkered down by laying off staff and cutting...

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Many Nations, One Voice -Standing with Standing Rock

They came from as far as Florida, Alaska, and Hawaii, “from the four directions,” says Geronimo Warren, holy man elder from the Apache Nation. They were called to action by a Facebook post from organizer Leslie Bradley, a Lakota Sioux and great-great granddaughter of Chief American Horse. Bradley, an Oregonian, wanted Oregon to show solidarity with native people’s resistance to the Dakota Access pipeline. She had hoped 40 people might attend her rally on November 12 at the Capitol Mall. Ten times that number showed up. Young and old, Osage and Burns Paiute, Siletz and Apache. As Bradley posted,...

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International elections, American elections -An observer reflects

While many are still surprised  by the outcome of the United States’ General Election, and following suggestions by the Republican candidate that “rigging” might occur, Salem Weekly spoke with someone with considerable perspective on elections: Salem’s Les Margosian. Margosian has served as an international elections observer for 20 years. He has worked in more than 20 countries, largely with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) a treaty organization with 56 members—all European countries including former Eastern Bloc Countries. OSCE’s initial purpose was to monitor ceasefire agreements, particularly in former Yugoslavia, and prevent outbreaks of hostilities between...

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Oregon physicians oppose Marion County burning

Doctors and environmentalists oppose a proposal for Marion County to burn Portland garbage in local incinerators. They object to Metro, the regional government for people living in the Portland area, shipping 200,000 tons of waste each year to the Covanta Marion waste-to-energy facility in Brooks. 200,000 tons represents one-fifth of Metro’s yearly solid waste trash. Metro is considering a change because its contract to ship garbage to an eastern Oregon landfill expires at the end of 2019 and it is seeking new ways of addressing the problem. The Covinta facility says that if it took on the extra Metro...

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OPEN HOUSE ON TINY HOUSES, GRANNY FLATS IN SALEM

Salem needs more housing, city studies conclude, and the city has come up with a plan to try to address that need. The City is considering allowing accessory dwelling units (ADUs), which include granny flats, mother-in-law units, tiny houses and conversions of garages, sheds, basements and attics into living spaces. Proponents say ADUs can expand housing choices, help provide affordable housing and meet Salem’s unmet need for more multifamily housing. An ADU is a second housing unit that is part of a main house, or it is a detached unit that is smaller but on the same lot. This form of housing has never been allowed in Salem, said city Project Manager Eunice Kim. Earlier this year, the council directed staff to come up with a proposal to allow them. “When zoning was first in place in the 1920s they were never put in [city codes],” Kim said. “In recent years we’ve gotten a lot of input from the public asking them to be allowed.” City staff and Housing Choices Advisory Committee members have explored this year how best the smaller units could be integrated into existing Salem neighborhoods. Size, setbacks, height, design, owner occupancy and neighborhood impacts are among some of the issues discussed. Impacts to parking, sidewalks and neighborhood density are among big concerns expressed. The committee includes representatives of neighborhood associations, the Planning Commission, City Council,...

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