Category: Cover Stories

Salem sees benefit from yoga therapy

A therapy first developed more than 100 years ago in India is helping contemporary Salem people lead less painful, more dynamic lives. Salem’s Leah Fish says the therapeutic yoga sessions led by Dr. Zohra Campbell at Indigo Wellness Center have sped her healing from a compression fracture; Rebecca Woodcock, who faces the challenges of an artificial knee, scoliosis and a “lumbar region completely compromised from nerve damage in the lower back” has experienced increased flexibility and reduced pain and reports the practice has helped her “regain that sense of movement and that sense of confidence in your body that...

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Late Night Salem -things are happening in the dark

“Winter is always a great time for business” in Salem, says Monty Miller, owner of The Half Penny Bar and Grill on South Commercial Street; “we are not competing against the sunshine!” Salem’s late night profile is changing.  With the shorter days and longer nights, music, food and beverage options typically become more popular anyway, but added to that, several new venues have entered the scene in the last year, joining the veterans in providing more diverse and entertaining opportunities in more than a decade. Kraftworks Taphouse On Facebook 241 Liberty St. NE Open until 2:30 a.m. 7 days a week Just 14 months old, Kraftworks Taphouse is the most consistent late, late-night destination in Salem.  “Being open late is a huge value to our customers,” says co-owner Alex Kruse, “especially to those who also work in the bar or restaurant industry, and typically work late.  They love the fact that they can still get a beer or cocktail with their co-workers after work.” Kruse says Kraftworks’ owners recognized early-on that many young, responsible Salem adults like to stay out late and socialize, “and we wanted to facilitate that by being open until 2:30 am every night of the week.”  Kraftworks’ complete food menu is available until 2 a.m. Kraftworks’s customers come to enjoy the wide selection of craft beers and to partake in off-premise sales (bottles to go)....

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Salem Prison Harvest

As farms and gardens throughout the Mid-Willamette Valley gather their end-of-autumn harvest, so do adults in custody at Mill Creek Correctional Facility in South Salem. The Mill Creek harvest is unique, however, because significant quantities of its produce is used to supplement the institution’s meals; much is shipped to another state correctional facility and much is donated to Oregon’s needy through a partnership with the Marion-Polk Food Share. One recent morning Michael Marks, an adult in custody at Mill Creek, spent hours picking and loading large bins of acorn squash.   “It is awesome that this gives us something productive to do,” he says.  “We’re giving back to the community.  I think it’s a great program.  It helps a lot of people and shows we have something to give.” Lt. Steve Bennett, Operations Lieutenant at the unfenced Mill Creek minimum custody facility, is proud of the farming the inmates do.  “This summer the men grew fresh tomatoes, zucchini, squash, cantaloupe, watermelon, corn, peppers, cucumbers and herbs and more to augment the food served in the kitchen,” he says.  “We have fields all around the facility and one plot is dedicated to the Marion-Polk Food Share.  But excess from other fields go to the Food Share as well.”  Additional produce is also shared with the Oregon Food Bank Network, which distributes statewide. In 2013, the first year the institution worked...

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Blended Future -National Hispanic Heritage Month Sept 15 to Oct 15

Despite living in the Pacific Northwest since the early 1800s and despite comprising 20 – 25% of Salem’s population, Hispanic people in Salem still often live lives largely separate from those who speak English. It is to bring cultures together and honor the “Oregonianos” who live, work and thrive in our state – and also to draw citizens into the State Capitol, now open to the public on Saturdays – that Hispanic Heritage Day will be held on September 26 at the Capitol. The day will be bilingual, says Matias Trejo de Dios, Executive Director of the Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana, (ICO) one of the organizers.   de Dios’ organization promotes a multilingual future for Oregon, where the barriers of language have mostly fallen, where more Spanish speakers than ever live in Oregon and prosperity results similar to that of successful multi-cultural cities of the past. “Fifty percent of kids in the Salem-Keizer schools are spanish speaking now,” says David Dahle, the bilingual force behind DowntownSalemStrong.org and Chair of the CAN-DO Neighborhood Association. “September/October is National Hispanic Heritage Month, so the time was right for this.  Salem will be more powerful if people come together and are exhilarated by the experience.” Statistics suggest that warmer relations might be timely.  Hispanics are no longer a minority in the state to our south; last year they became California’s largest population group,...

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Salem Hospital contributes $50,000 to fight expanded bus service

Salem Health has come out against a measure designed to expand bus service in Polk and Marion counties.  The measure, up for  public vote this November, would allow weekend bus service, later weeknight hours, youth passes for middle and high school students and holiday service. Supporters of the transit expansion question the hospital’s reasoning. The ballot measure, called 24-388, was created by pro-transit advocates and several members of the Salem-Keizer Transit Board.  A “yes” vote in the November 3 general election would mean that expanded bus service, long desired by locals, would be financed by a small levy on area businesses.  The tax would be 0.21 percent of a business’s annual payroll. Salem Hospital has invested $50,000 in a Political Action Committee (PAC) that opposes the measure,  the Create Jobs PAC, which works through the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce. “Salem Health recognizes that access to health care is a major concern in the Mid-Willamette Valley,” says Salem Health’s government relations staff.  “In fact, after conducting extensive focus groups in 2013, medical transportation was identified by our Board of Trustees’ Community Benefits Committee as one of three urgent community needs.” The hospital explains its position against expanded bus service several ways.  One is that, since the majority of the hospital’s patient appointments and services occur on weekdays and during business hours, the addition of busses outside these hours “will...

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