Category: Cover Stories

Many Nations, One Voice -Standing with Standing Rock

They came from as far as Florida, Alaska, and Hawaii, “from the four directions,” says Geronimo Warren, holy man elder from the Apache Nation. They were called to action by a Facebook post from organizer Leslie Bradley, a Lakota Sioux and great-great granddaughter of Chief American Horse. Bradley, an Oregonian, wanted Oregon to show solidarity with native people’s resistance to the Dakota Access pipeline. She had hoped 40 people might attend her rally on November 12 at the Capitol Mall. Ten times that number showed up. Young and old, Osage and Burns Paiute, Siletz and Apache. As Bradley posted,...

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Pikas: Trapped at the Top

Described by scientists on Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Oregon Field Guide as  “the cutest mammal,” the American Pika is a tiny, rabbit-like animal with round, Mickey Mouse like ears, a thick, a furry coat and no tail.  The small creature has evolved in a singular way, to carve a niche in rocky alpine terrain, often above the tree line. Pikas have adapted to survive in frigid climates where most mammals can’t – but they can perish in as few as six hours of 77-degree temperatures. Because of the animal’s vulnerability to heat, the National Park Service says that the charismatic...

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Poverty simulation builds empathy

A highly-rated exercise that allows participants to ‘walk in the shoes’ of those in poverty, promoting empathy and sparking more useful, authentic responses to those living in need, returns to Salem this November. “I remember feeling the stress in the room when the simulation was occurring,” says Kristen Aubert, who helped organize SAIF Corporation’s participation in 2014 and 2015. “People were scrambling, confused, frustrated and sad. It was a very moving experience to witness, and I heard many coworkers discussing it days and weeks later.” SAIF, an Oregon workers compensation insurance provider, participated in the program because it knows...

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Nice guy conditioned by the hate machine

“My dad really was radicalized,” says filmmaker Jen Senko, director of, The Brainwashing of My Dad, a documentary coming to the Salem Progressive Film Series. “I don’t mean he went around blowing stuff up, I just mean he was a fanatic. He became evangelical about his beliefs. He lived and breathed them. They were the most important thing to him.” For instance, after his “radicalization,” when her father sent emails, they were “always a forward of an extreme political email. They were never anything personal. When company would visit, he’d have to bring up his political point of view...

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Reimagining Salem as a Strong Town

About the cover: A street that shows wealth from good planning in Detroit, MI When they were first conceived of, streets like Lancaster Boulevard in northeast Salem were projected to be a source of commerce and community wealth for all. Subdivisions in south Salem were designed to provide housing that would bring ongoing good to the city as healthy places to live and thrive. But because of the way they were designed, says Chuck Marohn, founder and President of Strong Towns, a non-profit organization working to support a better model of development, Salem’s decisions about downtown, its roads and neighborhoods,...

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