Author: Salem Weekly

Spring Preview in a Theatre Town

by Jay Gipson-King Salem is a theatre town. It does not yet receive as much attention as Portland or Ashland—and justifiably so—but theatre is as much a part of Salem as cherries or the Golden Pioneer. How do we know? It is not just the 16 theatre companies in and around Salem, which is proportionate to Portland. It is not just the Salem Theatre Network, which ties these groups together, or the Salem Cultural-ites meet-up group, which unites audiences. It is also that Salem is generating unique and original work, which is a mark of true vitality. Here are...

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SW Art Pick

Art After Dark Leonard Kelly The Willamette Heritage Center   1313 Mill Street SE 503 585-7012 The next “Art After Dark” open studio event will take place on Thursday, April 14, from 5:00-7:00pm at the Art Studios at Mission Mill. Salem artist Leonard Kelly is the featured artist.  Mostly working in pastels, for their brilliant color and blending potential, Kelly bases many of his pieces on his travels.  His recent work will be  featured in the classroom gallery in the art studios on the second floor of the Wool Warehouse at the Willamette Heritage Center. Also during Art After Dark, the Compass Gallery, Max Marbles Bookbinder, and the Studio & Gallery of Julie Jeanseau will be open to visit.   Kitty Miller Art Exhibit Salem Public Library 585 Liberty St. SE 503-588-6315  A multi-media artist who travels around the country teaching art, Kitty Miller uses damages books in her artwork to help raise awareness about the benefits of reading paper books vs reading books on a computer screen. Kitty is an avid reader, and hopes her art will encourage more people to get reacquainted with their local library. The exhibit will be up for the month of April.  Hours: Tues-Thurs 10am-9pm,  Fri-Sat. 10am-6pm, Sun 1pm-5pm.   Solen Lewis   Capital Community Television   575 Trade Street SE 503 588-2288 When the subject of young artists comes up, most people...

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Ephemeral and Eternal—Remembered and Forgotten

by Judith Walden People are fascinated by vintage photos. Find one at a thrift store, or forgotten in a box, and we stop to wonder about the strangers in the picture. Who were these people in this abandoned bit of memory?  Sad or hopeful? Some memories are lost, but new ones are made. Life changes and goes on. The past may color the present, but we progress. This cycle is the inspiration for the new work being shown by painter Elizabeth Bauman at Compass Gallery. ” Memento Mori: A Reminder of the Shortness and Fragility of Life and Memory,”...

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SW Music Picks

Thursday, March 31st through Saturday, April 2nd.  2016 Cherry City Music Festival on CCTV – Times vary, please see music calendar this page. Actually, CCTV is one of the many venues to host performances for the greater Cherry City Music Festival, happening at many different venues around the city this weekend. But, a community television studio is a pretty cool place to have a show, or 12. Yep. Over three days, CCTV will have 12 bands performing AND simulcasting it live on Channel 22 and on local radio station KMUZ 88.5/100.7FM. They want a live audience for this event. That’s you and me! We go to the shows and make it extra real and special. Does this just sound so unbelievably cool for our community? Do you want to get involved? Excellent. They are all about volunteers. CCTV’s contact info: http://www.cctvsalem.org/about-ccmf or by phone 503-588-2288. Everything is better with YOU. Saturday, April 2nd at 7pm at The Willamette Valley Grill:  Rich McCloud – Acoustic Singer/Songwriter/R&B/Soul/HipHop/Soul/Rap – whatever he wants. Every Saturday night in April, The Willamette Valley Grill presents its Red Music Concert Series featuring Oregon’s finest musicians. Well, they certainly started it off right with Rich McCloud. I’ve only seen Rich three times, but every time was unique, mesmerizing and absolute quality. He refuses to play one kind of music, because he likes so many different styles of...

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Let’s Talk About Healthy Relationships

Guest opinion by Angele Kirk When you think back to your first love, your first date, your first relationship, the memories may make you smile. Not everyone is fortunate in that way; it’s the unhappy truth that many young people find themselves in abusive or sexually coercive situations. Teens experiencing dating violence – whether physical or emotional – are more likely to become pregnant and report an STD diagnosis. And while anyone can be the victim of violence, young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of dating violence, almost triple the national average. Young people need...

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How to Pass a Bond Measure -Salem Weekly Editorial

The Salem City Council will hold what may be their final work session to discuss a November bond measure for a new police facility on Monday, April 4th. Time is running out to decide the cost and the scope of the bond measure. It has been eight long years since the last City bond measure passed in Salem, the $99.8 million “Streets and Bridges Bond” measure. In 2008 we were just heading into the depths of the Great Recession. The reality of that, and what it would do to home values and jobs and the Salem economy in general had not really become apparent. Now we are on the far side of the Great Recession. We are still paying off the Streets and Bridges Bond, as well as large school bond measure that passed in the same year, and a Chemeketa Community College bond and Fire Department bond passed in 2006. Are voters ready to once again to raise their property taxes to invest in their community? On April 4th the City Council will receive the results of the latest scientific poll conducted by the Portland firm of DHM Research that should give them a pretty good idea. DHM conducted an earlier poll for the city, in January, 2014, that showed that only 48% of Salem voters would vote for an $80 million bond measure to build a 75,000...

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Meaningful hope for Oregon veterans

by Helen Caswell Oregon voters will have the opportunity to decide whether to unlock 1.5 % of Oregon Lottery revenues to help veterans in the state with a permanent ‘set-aside’ for education, housing, employment, healthcare, transportation and for programs that facilitate reintegration. The monies would mean an estimated $18 million/biennium of discretionary Lottery funds and, through that money, the leveraging of billions in federal funds that are available for veterans but are currently left on the table. The means will be a measure on the November 8 ballot which is the result of the passage of HJR202 in the...

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Clothing for them, a queer and trans exchange

by Celine Sannes-Pond When we get dressed in the morning, we pick outfits and accessories designed to show the world what kind of people we are. For queer people like myself, though, getting dressed can be difficult, or even downright depressing. Transgender and queer people, whose gender does not match the one assigned to them at birth, often find themselves staring at a closet full of clothes that match what society expects them to wear, but not who they truly are. Many queer and trans people wish to, and eventually do, swap out the clothing of their assigned genders...

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Your turn to weigh in on the new police facility and seismic upgrades

The City of Salem is doing polling and surveying in March to try to determine what citizens think about plans for a new police facility. They also want to learn about whether citizens are ready to increase their property taxes in November to pay for it. At a work session on February 29th, the Council voted to select the “O’Brien site” just north of downtown, where the O’Brien car dealerships used to be, as the location for the new police facility. Next comes the more difficult decision of determining the size and the cost of the facility, and deciding whether to include seismic upgrades to City Hall and the Library in a November bond measure. The City’s architects, the DLR Group based in Chicago, are recommending a 148,000 square foot police facility be built at a cost of $81.4 million. Presently the Salem Police Department occupies 28,000 square feet at City Hall and 20,000 square feet elsewhere. Salem has hired DHM Research to do a scientific poll in March to ask a random sample of voters what they would be willing to support in November. Two years ago the same firm did a poll that showed that only 48% of voters would be willing to support an $80 million bond measure to build a 75,000 square foot police facility and to complete a seismic upgrade of City Hall and the...

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New, intuitive city website on the way

In response to a 2015 city council goal, the City of Salem is launching a new web site later this year. The newly designed site will be structured to be more intuitive, says Courtney Knox Busch, Strategic Initiatives Manager of the City Manager’s Office. Intuitive site design means that the shape of the images, the colors used and the placement of links all follow simple rules that make them easy to recognize and navigate. Salem residents have complained in the past that the current site, which may be understandable by City Hall insiders, can be confounding to visitors. The...

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Two local groups seek to support Salem’s homeless

The Salem Homeless Coalition and the Mid-Willamette Homeless Initiative Task Force are two local groups formed to increase services for the homeless in Salem. The Coalition is a group of volunteers from five Salem congregations and representatives from the Salem Police Force, the Union Gospel Mission, the Community Action Agency and Northwest Human Services, as well as interested individuals throughout the Salem-Keizer community. It has been meeting regularly on the first Monday of the month at 7:00 pm in St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 790 Marion Street, Salem. The group is facilitated by Audrey Schackel. At its most recent meeting on March 7th the Coalition group heard an impressive presentation by Dan Bryant of Eugene who reviewed that city’s current programs including semi-improved camping facilities, transitional housing in “tiny houses” and more permanent micro housing that will require modest rents but will also provide a homeowner’s equity. All Interested persons are invited to Coalition meetings. The Task Force, in contrast, is a quasi-governmental group recently empanelled to study and reduce homelessness in the area. It held its first meeting on February 17 at the Salem Public Library. The Task Force consists of 20 members from the region including the mayors of Salem and Keizer, commissioners from Marion and Polk Counties, sheriffs of Marion and Polk Counties, the Chief of Police for Salem and a variety of other public and private...

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Slates set for Salem’s primary elections

On May 17th Salem will hold a primary election for a new mayor and councilors for Wards 1, 3, 5 and 7.  State Legislative primaries will take place at the same time. In the mayor’s race, longtime Councilor Chuck Bennett from Ward 1 and Carole Smith, a noted activist and former owner of the Grand Theater, will face off in what is expected to be a competitive contest. Absent an unexpected write-in campaign by a third party the winner of the primary should be the new Mayor and will serve a two year term. Three of four “odd numbered” council seats are contested. In Ward 1, downtown, Jan Kailuweit and Cara Kaser will appear on the ballot. In Ward 3, a sprawling district in the southeast portion of the City, incumbent Councilor Brad Nanke is the only candidate. In Ward 5, a large ward in the northeast, new comers Tiffany Partridge and Matthew Ausec will compete to replace retiring Councilor Diane Dickey. Ward 7, covering the southeast portion of the City, features incumbent Warren Bednarz against challenger Sally Cook. Councilors serve a four-year term. The terms for both the new mayor and councilors begin in January, 2017. In the local State Senate Districts there are only two elections. In District 9 incumbent Fred Girod, a Republican, is unopposed in the primary as is Democratic challenger Rick Hairisay.  In District...

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Longtime councilor seeks mayor position

One of two candidates hoping to be Salem’s next mayor, Chuck Bennett is already serving his 9th year as Ward 1’s city councilor. While councilors have 4-year terms, mayors serve two years. They represent and guide the city and are ‘the first among equals’ on the Salem City Council. “I’m very proud of several accomplishments I’ve had as a city councilor,” Bennett says, “including public-private activities that have brought over 200 new residents downtown; the soon-to-be developed bike boulevards on Union, Maple, and Winter streets; launching the State Street revitalization project; railroad quiet zones to be completed this year...

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Matthew Ausec, running in salem’s Ward 5

Matt Ausec, City Council candidate for Ward 5, hopes to bring to the office the ability to advocate for the residents of the ward and to make sure that their needs are well represented. Ward 5, a large sprawling district in northeast Salem will present voters in the election on May 17th with a race of two newcomers as candidates. Ausec is facing Tiffany Partridge. Ausec recognizes that Ward 5 has special needs: It is split by Portland Road; runs from Market St in the south to Chemawa Rd in the north and from I-5 in the east to...

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The (Political) Diary of a Young Girl

by Jay Gipson-King When I first heard that Pentacle Theatre was producing The Diary of Anne Frank, my first reaction was, “not that old saw again.” But since then, Donald Trump announced that if President, he would ban all members of a specific religious group from entering the country, the KKK distributed recruitment flyers in Silverton and Klamath Falls, and an African American family in south Salem received threatening notes left on their front door. (This happened. Look it up.) So yes, you could say that a play on the more extreme forms of intolerance and discrimination is still...

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Breakfast on the Run -Salem Writes

Flash Fiction: by R.S. Stewart   Byron was hurrying down 9th Avenue on his way to deliver a talk that might be his salvation.  He had just completed its final draft this morning, skipping breakfast and now regretting it. His stomach was making those sounds he disapproved of in others. He did not have time to stop to eat on this crowded avenue, since a delay of even five minutes would make him late for his appointment with Grayson, Currier, and Co. the firm he was trying most to impress, and had so far with an introductory letter, outlining his ideas for an imaginary project, part of the long-range real plan for development, change, and advancement that the firm was aiming toward. So far, Bryon was the individual “most likely,” as expressed in a message from the top official, urging him onward.  And onward Byron walked, though the aromas escaping from eateries were tempting him more and more, causing him to slow his pace, to take deeper breaths, as if the very smell of food would sustain him.   Why, oh, why had he not eaten that stash of yogurt and blueberries, that slice of pumpkin bread that he remembered just now on the top shelf of his fridge?  In this unseasonable weather people were sidewalk dining. Waiters were bringing plates of pancakes, scrambled eggs, juice, and cups of...

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SW Art Picks

Nancy Norman Bush Barn Art Center  600 Mission St. SE  503-581-2228 Originally from California, Nancy Norman has lived and worked in Oregon for over a decade.  She is Known for her vivid colors and surreal and whimsical paintings of people and animals.  Norman has received numerous regional and international awards, and her paintings are included in collections throughout the United States and abroad. Her work is also featured on several greeting cards, as posters and on wine labels.  The dreamlike images in her paintings spring from her imagination, inspired by travel, memories, and life experiences.  The show runs through April 23. www.SalemArt.org   5th Annual Young Artists’ Showcase Bush Barn Art Center  600 Mission St. SE  503-581-2228   The 5th annual Young Artists’ Showcase features the work of kindergarten through 12th grade students from Marion, Polk and Yamhill Counties. New this year, several local elementary, middle and high schools, as well as youth organizations will be participating. Projects completed in SAA’s Artists in the Schools program will also be featured. Three week showings of works submitted through schools will be: grades K-5  March 11-April 2;  grades 6-12 from April 8-30. Also the Community Youth Art Show will present works submitted directly from local students in all grades and will be on display for the duration of the exhibition.   Fun With Animals  Currents Gallery  532 NE Third St.  ...

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Portrait of a Self-Named Artist

Judith Walden Painter Scott Gordon Woodhouse  a fun and interesting recent addition to Salem’s art scene moved from Portland, where he lived for 8 years. Before that he had lived in California, where he enjoyed a successful career as a furniture restorer and designer. Quiet with a subtle, understated humor, Woodhouse discovered and loved painting  young, and credits a high school art teacher with giving him a good background in many painting techniques. Unfortunately when looking at college he was discouraged by a harshly critical teacher, and ended up channeling his energy into music and the humanities, although he...

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SW Music Picks

Thursday, March 24th at 9pm at The Fifty Pub & Grub: Wicked Haven, In The Name of God (Eugene), and Toxic Zombie – Metal. Well, it’s been awhile since I’ve seen a metal show in town, so this is pretty exciting. Salem’s own Wicked Haven’s Facebook profile lists band members as follows: Brian Hare – Balls, Corey Yates – Chunk and Stephen Owens – Thunder. Well if that doesn’t pique your interest, you might be dead. Toxic Zombie is a metal/punk/glam band from Portland and claims they will “awaken the dead (ironic) and eat your brains.” Also on the...

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Another Councilors Comments: ward: 6

Daniel Benjamin Hello folks, I’d like to thank Salem Weekly for reaching out and extending an opportunity for me to talk to the great citizens of Salem. I first like to thank all the folks in Ward 6 that voted in the city council election last year. I feel in many cases local elections are more crucial for a community’s safety and prosperity than federal. Public involvement is also crucial in many ways. That’s why a neighborhood association is a perfect place to get plugged in. Another great avenue for information is the City of Salem website. By participating...

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