Author: Salem Weekly

The Business, Poems by Stephanie Lenox -Review by Vere McCarty

It is a confident title for a book of poems, but The Business put me off at first.  Why would I read poetry if not to get my mind off the stress of business? Stephanie Lenox explains that the idea came from her co-office-worker Carla, who whispered, “You’re a writer, right? You should write about this. ” “Working in an office,” she admits, “is not particularly poetic. But I wrote this book because I wanted to address that part of our lives that few poems touch. I believe that poetry can be a way to celebrate and mourn the hours of our lives we give, out of necessity, to others in order to survive.” Agro-business is also represented.  The title poem goes right down to the farm, where my own work life began. The tractor in the field does not take things personally. It is not affronted by the way wheat bends before it, all that luscious weakness. There is no mind, just a motor, a servitude of parts churning politely together.  The oily smoke is only smoke, no more. I still think my uncle’s old combine hated me.  But the writing feels needed, like knocking off for a mid-morning break. The farm is hard on the body and easy on the spirit.  The office, for me, is just the opposite.  Nice people, benefits, a comfy chair – why should it...

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FREAKY FRIDAY FOOD TRUCK FRENZY FUNDRAISER, UPCYCLE OREGON

Friday May 13th: FREAKY FRIDAY FOOD TRUCK FRENZY FUNDRAISER On Friday the 13th come down to Willamette Humane Society for our Freaky Friday Food Truck Frenzy Fundraiser, to help pets who are down on their luck and waiting for new homes! There will be food trucks a-plenty, and beer from Santiam Brewing Co. for sale! All tips will be donated to help pets in the shelter. Willamette Humane Society will be open late until 9 pm on May 13th for adoptions and purchases in Davenport’s Den! Well behaved, on-leash dogs are welcome at the event! Supervised off-leash dog playgroups will be available. Need a babysitter? Register your kids...

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Salem safe from inundation!

by Helen Caswell Salem residents concerned about the coming Cascadia subduction earthquake can cross one potential catastrophe off their lists, says the US Army Corps of Engineers. And that is t he disaster of the Detroit Dam falling to pieces and its water engulfing the city. It’s a topic local people wonder about. “I’ve been asked repeatedly about Detroit Dam failure in a Cascadia [earthquake] since I began this job,” says Ed Flick, Marion County Emergency Manager. “The consequences would be catastrophic, but the likelihood is extremely remote.” Completed in 1953, the Detroit Dam is only 45 miles east of Salem and was built before Oregonians knew the risk of earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest . It wasn’t until the 1970s that people began to understand the state had numerous faults both off shore and onshore. In particular, geologists learned the region is subject to massive Cascadia Subduction Zone quakes which occur about once every 300 years. It’s now been 316 years since the last Cascadia , but Matt Craig, Dam Safety Program Manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, says that though the Detroit Dam was not constructed with seismic concerns in mind, the corps does not anticipate a failure. “We do risk assessments on an ongoing basis,” he says, “in particular of what might happen in a 9.0.” A magnitude-9.0 earthquake is the most intense possible...

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How we move forward

by Laura Gildart Sauter I’ve been a fan of the Salem Progressive Film Series for some time.  The monthly films are always thought-provoking and informative, and discuss issues that should be important to any concerned citizen.  However, this month’s award-winning offering, Bikes vs. Cars (90min), directed by Fredrik Gertten, produced by Margarete Jangard and Elin Kamlert, is particularly relevant to the City of Salem and many of its current issues: the disagreement over the construction of a third bridge, the controversy over downtown parking, the need for expanded bus service, and the movement to reverse the one-way street grid. ...

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The Play’s the Thing -Focus on Lisa Joyce

by R.S. Stewart “I wear many hats,” says Lisa Joyce, Executive Director of Pentacle Theatre, characterizing her job as the “voice of the theatre.” Selling tickets while the front office attendant is on a coffee break and answering the phone after business hours in the Pentacle Box Office on Liberty Street are only two jobs that fall outside her official position. An executive director primarily focuses on fundraising; writing grants, policies, and newsletters. Lisa also manages the theatre’s property in the West Salem hills, supports the Board in its many decisions, and creates marketing campaigns. She emphasizes her job...

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Roberta and the Deep Blue Sea

by Jay Gipson-King The Verona Studio dives deep to uncover an unlikely romance between two broken people in Danny and the Deep Blue Sea, directed by Jeff Sanders. Written by John Patrick Shanley, Danny and the Deep Blue Sea brings together Danny, a young man with anger issues, and Roberta, a woman with a troubling self-image. Danny believes he has killed a man; Roberta has committed an unspeakable act. They both suffer from unbearable guilt, and this burden—and the hope of solace—brings them together. The play is named for Danny, but it is Roberta’s story. It is she who...

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Nelson Sandgren: An Artist’s Life, Keizer Heritage, A to Z Alphabet Show, Chloe Raymond & Totem Shriver

Nelson Sandgren: An Artist’s Life The Hallie Ford Museum of Art 700 State St.  503 370 6855 May 14-July 17 Corvallis Oregon artist and teacher Nelson Sandgren (1917-2006) created art in three primary media—watercolor, oil, and lithography.  His decades long career gained him viewers across the Pacific Northwest, up and down the West Coast, in museum exhibitions nationwide, and in gallery shows in Europe.  A concise retrospective exhibition of the paintings and prints of this important local artist will be on view at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art through July 17.  Organized by Professor Emeritus and Senior Faculty...

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Making Connections and Building Community

by Judith Walden What makes a vibrant and growing art scene in a community?  Well, artists of course, but what about all the things making up the framework that artists operate in?  According to Marika Garvey, Artists in Action’s new Publicity Coordinator, a big part of the equation is volunteers. This is something Garvey is very familiar with, as she volunteers as a gallery guide at the Salem Art Association in addition to her position with AIA. Artists in Action, which was started in 1999, was established to get Salem artists involved with each other and the community, and...

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SW Music Picks

Thursday, May 12th at 7pm at Shotskis Woodfired Pizza: Willamette Music Night with Gringo Star, Rabid Habit, Frontal Lobes, Bitch Mob, Gabriel Klute, and Zachery Johnston. This is a goodbye show for Willamette Students, as this is the last day of finals. All bands hail from Willamette University and music ranges from acoustic to hip hop. There will be discounted food and drink and minors are totally welcome until 9pm. Sounds like a hoot and a great chance to hear music that you don’t usually see in Salem venues. And you know, thank all the gods I don’t have to take finals anymore. Good luck students! Saturday, May 14th at 8pm at Brown’s Towne Lounge: “A Very Incognita Birthday Benefit Show” with Grandma Dynamite, Transendia and Jesus Chrysler & the Holy Smokes – $5 suggested donation but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. This event is raising money for immediate needs of homeless youth in the Salem area. The proceeds will be given directly to the H.O.S.T. Youth Street Outreach and Drop In Center. There will be raffle prizes that include gift certificates from Cherry City Waxworks, Court Appearance Styling Studio, various local artisans, and much more. This also a 46th birthday shindig for Tara Colvin, but she requests donations be made in lieu of gifts. Find out more about H.O.S.T. at northwesthumanservices.org. Sunday, May...

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Vote Damn It

As a citizen of this democracy it is your obligation to vote in every election. Ballots have been sent out to registered voters and can be mailed in several days before the election or dropped off before 8 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17th. If you are an adult resident  of Oregon and are reading this you have either: a) already voted in the May 17th Primary Election, b) have received your ballot but have not cast it yet, or c) never registered to vote. If you are in the third category, we’re sorry, but you’ve lost your opportunity to participate this time around. Unlike many states, Oregon has a registration deadline for upcoming elections. That deadline has come and gone. But that should not stop you from registering for our next election. And thankfully, due to the recently passed “Motor Voter” law people registering or renewing their driver’s license will automatically become registered voters. If, on the other hand, you are registered and have already voted, then thank you. Oregon makes it so ridiculously easy to vote. All you need is a pen and a stamp. We hope you completed your entire ballot and did not “undervote.” That’s when people fail to vote for a candidate because they can’t decide or are unfamiliar with the candidates. If the names were unfamiliar, we hope you pulled out and read the...

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Non-Believers Come Out of the Closet

by Laurel Hines If you are one of the ever-growing numbers of people who don’t believe in a religion, you are “a-theist” (not part of a religion). If you don’t like the religious dogma that Ted Cruz and others hope to inflict on the nation, you must come out of the closet and declare your “a-theism”. If it worries you when legislators make policies based on religion instead of modern science, you must come out of the closet and declare yourself as “a-theist”! A Pew Research survey recently found that 23 percent of the U. S. population is nonaffiliated,...

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Looking for America

by Elijah Rakha-Sheketoff As America by Simon and Garfunkel waves over the crowd, I wonder how on earth I got so lucky. Not only am I an upper middle class, cisgendered, white man, who grew up in a loving, supportive family, but I am listening to one of my favorite songs by one of my favorite artists, and I am about to see my candidate for president tell me, and the people of Salem, once again how we can change the world, making it a more compassionate, better place for all. Politics has flowed through my veins since the moment blood started pumping. Some of my first memories are from Portland peace rallies when before I could even talk I would make my voice heard by pounding on a Wizard of OZ cookie tin. In preschool, I got my entire class to cast their symbolic ballot for Kerry—a unanimous liberal vote (albeit from four-year-olds) from a notoriously conservative town. My is life filled with these moments, flocking to events that both challenge me intellectually, and ones where I can feel a part of something bigger. So being at a Bernie rally, and having press access to take pictures from the podium, was, for me, shangri-la; as it was for many young voters at the rally. Brandon Roth, 18, instinctively blurted out “Compassion” as the word that best describes Bernie,...

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May 1 march in Salem

Photos and story by Jason Cox Hundreds of progressive Oregonians marched on the Oregon State Capitol on Sunday, May 1, with a timely theme of “Today We March, Tomorrow We Vote!” Numerous allied groups found common cause in speaking up for workers’ rights, keeping families together and speaking up against hate. Causa Oregon and the Oregon School Employees Association organized the...

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End the Oligarchy -Salem Weekly Endorsements

Last year former President Jimmy Carter made headlines when he said the U.S. had become an “oligarchy” — a government run by a small group of wealthy and influential people. We believe this is what Salem has become in the past 14 years. Fourteen years ago, when progressive Mayor Mike Swaim decided not to run for reelection, the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce, along with allied business groups like the Salem Association of Realtors and the Homebuilders Association of Marion & Polk Counties, saw an opening to install a more conservative City Council that would be much more friendly...

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Election Day May 17, Get that ballot IN, Why May Matters

Get that ballot IN Marion County ballots are being mailed this week. Mark yours and turn it in as soon as possible. Why? – You won’t get phone calls. Elections officials keep track of who has turned in their ballot (though not what your vote was). That information appears in online databases. Candidates and their volunteers can see if you’ve voted. They often call tardy voters to get their ballot in. You can avoid the hassle if you mail your ballot in early. – You won’t have to find a drop box to drop your ballot by hand. Ballot drop box locations are printed on pages 4 and 5 of the Marion County Voter Pamphlet. But stamps are 47 cents now. Avoid the drive, the gas and the traffic! Mail your ballot immediately. Election Day May 17 Mail by May 10 “If you don’t mail before May 10, you are taking a chance,” says Bill Burgess, Marion County Clerk. Salem mail – even mail destined for Salem – is now routed up through Portland. This can delay mail delivery times back in Salem. For this reason, Burgess and other Marion County election officials are urging voters who want to mail their ballots to post it by May 10 – ONE FULL WEEK before election day. “We’ve seen time and again, that a few ballots don’t make it in time....

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What Salem people say

We recently asked Salem residents on Liberty Street and in South Salem if they knew who Salem’s mayor was, and if they knew who was running in May to replace her. We also wondered what issues they hoped the city would prioritize after the election. We were surprised that so many younger people were unaware of the name of their city’s top elected official, or candidates who have been running to take her job. We enjoyed the range of good ideas Salem people have as the city moves forward.                              ...

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Little school, big politics -Willamette students speak out

If you want to hear firebrand political ideas, what better place to start than at the local college? As this year’s election season kicks into gear, the students of Willamette University have thrown themselves into the national political conversation. There is a diversity of political opinion at the school that makes itself known in nearly every political conversation. Salem Weekly sat down with students to hear more about their political thoughts and engagement. The majority of students appear to support Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, while supporters of former Sec. of State Hillary Clinton number slightly fewer but are just as vocal. While the reasons students support each candidate are diverse, many students’ opinions reflect broader conversations being had around the Clinton and Sanders campaigns. For Sanders supporters, one of the main issues students consistently raised was a wariness of establishment politics. To Sam Hilburn, class of 2016, Clinton represents a deepening of existing problems seen in the status quo, particularly income inequality. Senior Shamir Cervantes, the recently-resigned student body president, elaborates on the belief that Sander is more likely to listen to outsider perspectives, pointing to issues like foreign policy. Although Cervantes cannot vote due to his status as a non-citizen legal resident, he articulates an ardent support of Senator Sanders. When asked why he believes Sanders espouses a better position on foreign policy than the experienced Sec....

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