Author: Salem Weekly

Sculptural Art, BE BOLD & “The Art of Politics”

Sculptural Art of Ted Gaty Elsinore Framing & Fine Art Gallery 444 Ferry St SE  503 581-4642 For their 30th Anniversary month, the work of local multimedia artist Ted Gaty is featured at the Elsinore Gallery. Gaty incorporates metal, wood and other organic materials in unique wall and table sculpture. Brilliant colors contrasted with the natural beauty of the wood, flowing curves, and repeated forms make Gaty’s one of a kind pieces beautiful additions to any setting. Show continues through June 25. Hours: 9am-6pm. Mon-Fri; 10 am-5pm. Sat.  http://www.elsinoregallery.com/   BE BOLD Currents Gallery 532 NE Third St.   McMinnville ...

Read More

Rebuttal to misleading article

We became frustrated at the sorts of arguments expressed in a recent Statesman Journal artical by Pete Sepp, president of the National Taxpayer’s Union (NTUF).   This generalized “Lower taxes at any cost” type of argument is typical of pro-business front groups for the top one percent, such as the NTUF. The article cites a recent poll that reports many Americans feel they pay too much in taxes.  Do they think they pay too much for automobiles?  How about food?  And a big question would be:  how about housing?  In other words, why is it that the supposedly too high price of public services is the only thing that’s ever questioned?  If the same sort of questions were asked about almost any consumer good, the issue of quality of the goods would likely immediately come up.  “Well, I’ll pay more for a quality product – that’s only smart…” Let’s examine that argument.  Private sector goods come in many shapes, sizes and degrees of necessity.  To be sure, food, clothing, housing and other “necessities” are included.  But so are lawn chairs, hula hoops, backyard barbecues and the like.  When last we looked, most public goods can clearly be labelled necessities: police and fire protection, emergency medical services, schools and roads, etc.  So supposedly we should be willing to pay more money for a better barbecue, but not for a better...

Read More

Is Oregon cannabis “out of the closet”?

Seven months after the legalization of recreational marijuana, one would expect Oregonians to be open about their use of the drug. Nationally, the state is considered predominantly “blue” and cannabis-friendly. But many in Oregon still conceal pot use from partners, employers, friends and children. They say the drug has yet to become truly socially acceptable. “Lisa” (not her real name) has used marijuana “recreationally” to address anxiety and chronic pain for years. She says, “I hide the fact that I smoke, even though it is now legal.” Lisa lost her job because of cannabis; during a medical exam following...

Read More

Salem Vote by numbers

Voters registration and polling data show that Salem is predominantly progressive. In recent years, however those values have not reflected in city government. But Tuesday May 17th saw a sea change election in Salem, Oregon. For the second consecutive election, the city had a large number of contested races; 3 out of the 4 council seats were competitive, with only incumbent Brad Nanke in Ward 3 unopposed.  Salem also saw its first contested mayoral election since 2010. In the city council races, progressive candidates won all 3 of the contested seats, and all three were younger than council members...

Read More

Minto Bridge, Falling Behind? Reasons and Rhyme

“London Bridge is falling down, falling down…” says the English nursery rhyme. Is Salem’s version to be: “Minto Bridge is falling behind, falling behind…?” Falling behind it is from earlier estimates admits Aaron Kimsey, Senior Project Manager for the City of Salem, but, he adds, there is still time to meet the project’s final completion date of December 31, 2016. Meeting the substantial completion date of September 30th might prove more difficult. The delay is due to difficulties in constructing the curved, lofty arches that will sweep 300 ft over the Willamette Slough and attach to fixed abutments on...

Read More

Waste dumping fees raised to save agency

Last month, after 24 years, the Marion County Board of Commissioners approved of increases in several types of waste disposed in Marion County. Tipping fees are charged to “tip” waste into a dump. The Salem-Keizer Recycling & Transfer Station east of town and the North Marion Transfer Station near Woodburn, will see a $20 increase in the per ton tip fee for franchised garbage haulers. This will mean an increase for the garbage haulers from $67.45 per ton to $87.45 per ton, and at transfer stations from $87.45 per ton to $107.45 per ton. Licensed contractor waste will go up from $75.45/ton to $95.45/ton. At the Browns Island Demolition Landfill, rates for non-friable asbestos will raise from $30 to $75/yard and demolition materials will raise from $10.50 to $13.00/yard. All increases will be effective October 1, 2016. The reason for the hike is that funding for Marion County’s Environmental Services Department had dropped in recent years. Environmental Services, a widely valued county service, manages landfills, promotes recycling and education and provides EarthWISE certification for local businesses. The department’s revenues have been generated for years from tipping fees and from income created at a fourth facility, the Covanta energy-from-waste facility near Brooks. At Covanta, waste is burned to create electricity, and metal is recovered to be sold. But neither electricity nor the facility’s metal is as valuable as it used...

Read More

Hey Marion County, You mailed it too late!

Once again on Election Day, May 17, 2016, Marion County election officials received ballots too late to be counted. If you mailed yours less than a week ahead of time, yours might have been among them. According to Marion County Clerk, Bill Burgess, during the November 2014 gubernatorial election, 715 Marion County ballots were mailed too late and were never counted. Longer mailing times in 2016 result from two changes in US Postal Service policy, Burgess says. First, Salem mail began being routed through Portland the summer of 2012, meaning that a resident who mails a ballot to the...

Read More

BEHIND ENEMY LINES, FAIRY TALES & STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

Thursday, June 9th: BEHIND ENEMY LINES: THE TRUE STORY OF A FRENCH JEWISH SPY IN NAZI GERMANY Marthe Cohen, an heroic World War II spy for the Allies, will be speaking in Salem June 9th at Willamette University. This is an event for people of all ages, a way to teach tolerance with Marthe Cohen’s true story. Following the talk, “Behind Enemy Lines”, the book Marthe Cohen authored, will be available for purchase at a booksigning. Tickets available at https://behindenemylinessalem.eventbrite.com $12 in advance, $18 at door. Sponsorships are available for $180 and include 3 tickets and a signed book....

Read More

OREGON FIELD GUIDE WITH STEVE AMEN, VIETNAM – AN INNER VIEW

Thursday, May 26th OREGON FIELD GUIDE WITH STEVE AMEN Oregon Field Guide started as a partnership between Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The series premiered in 1990 on Oregon Public Broadcasting with a segment about the impact of drift netting for tuna on dolphins. After 27 seasons, Oregon Field Guide remains one of the highest rated of any locally produced PBS show in the nation. Hear behind-the-scene stories of how some of its award-winning shows were filmed from longtime host and executive producer Steve Amen.  Cost: $5 suggested donation/person at the door Email: Info@StraubEnvironmentalCenter.org ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Steve Amen is...

Read More

Powered Up and Painting

Mostly self-taught, painter Jeri Raynel identifies her style as an expressionistic. Her work, she says, comes from a place of emotion. Even when painting for a class, she chooses an image that resonates with her somehow. Her new show “Jeri Raynel: A Powered Up Mind” is a marked change from some of her past work which focused on the emotions surrounding the loss of loved ones to breast cancer. That work, she says, was a necessary part of the “evolution of soul, mind, and spirit” that made her newest show possible. This new series evokes the current energy in her life; love of Salem, connection with friends, the textures of the buildings, and the vibrant colors of summer in the city. As she describes it “the contrast of energy and calm that is a spectrum of life.” The bold lines and rich, vibrant colors are what you notice first, but textures are very important to Raynel’s painting. After starting with oils in her teens, Raynel moved to acrylics. She uses both wood and canvas, which she loves for different reasons. The feel of wood, and its ability to easily support the many-textured layers she favors makes wood the choice for some of her work, while canvas is better when she wants some of the piece smooth. Her style is very “hands on” sometimes literally using her fingers. For her...

Read More

Ninety Two

An engaging parable about a man who measures his progress with modest markers of success, such as the octane of his gasoline.  While pursuing a conscientious sheltered life in Salem, he daydreams about experiencing first hand how the other half lives. – Editor   Ninety Two By John Van Dreal He thinks about this: He does ok.  Puts 92 in his car.  A Lexus (well, a 12 year old Lexus). He listens to KMUZ, 100.7 on the FM dial.  Excellent programming, all of the time.  It’s public radio, so he makes sure to pay his annual fees and even doubles them, because he can… because he should.  Has the donation swag to prove it:  a sticker on his Lexus, a cap, a coffee mug… all with monikers that read KMUZ Community Radio.  It’s quality listening from a community station.  His people.  His music.  No satellite. Buys local, gives to the shelter, doesn’t hate.  Gets angry when people do, especially when they hate the gays.  He has friends who are, and he’s passionate that they should be free to love whom they want.  Just as he is… free, that is.  He’s not gay.  But wouldn’t care if he was.  His wife might. Works in public service, but as an Administrator.  So he does ok.  Puts 92 in his car.  Safety is important.  That’s why the Lexus.  That and quality.  That’s...

Read More

Rethinking The Way We Vote -Salem Weekly Editorial

The American electoral system is by no means the world’s most democratic one.  Indeed, our “first-past-the-post” electoral model allows candidates at the state and federal levels to win office without majority support.  Since candidates only need to get the most votes (a plurality) to finish “first,” they often “represent” their constituencies against the will of the majority of voters. In national and state elections, first-past-the-post helps secure the interests of long-established political machines like those of the Republican and Democratic Parties.  These parties use their political power and access to vast financial resources to make ballot access difficult for new rivals and, if the latter do manage to field candidates, voters often fear that selecting one of them is tantamount to “wasting” their votes.  As a  result our two party system effectively limits political choices commonplace in parliamentary systems around the world (e.g. Green, Socialist, Christian Democratic, and Nationalist parties).  While such a system may encourage stability, it also stifles and marginalizes new voices. Few democratic countries find the American model attractive.  In Europe, for example, 21 out of 28 countries use some form of proportional representation to ensure that legislative bodies actually reflect the spectrum of political opinion in the society.  Tellingly, virtually none of the new democracies in Eastern Europe adopted American electoral practices after the end of the Cold War.  While by no means perfect, these...

Read More

Wendy Steinburg, Sandy Segna, “Entrance”

Wendy Steinburg Oaks Gallery Willamette Art Center Oregon State Fair Grounds 2330 17th St. NE The functional and whimsical work of multi-talented artist Wendy Steinburg will be featured at Willamette Art Center’s Oaks Gallery through June.  Steinburg, who has seen herself as an artist since childhood, discovered the Willamette Art Center upon moving to Salem and has been an active member there.  She  enjoys painting in her home studio, but values the WAC environment saying “There is nothing better than making art in a studio with so many amazing fellow artists.”  Her bowls are a part of the Empty...

Read More

John Pounds Fundraiser Day, Carlos Barata and Pending Black, David Bowie

Sunday, May 29th at 2pm ‘til close at Mac’s Place in Silverton: John Pounds Fundraiser Day!  Recovering from a stroke takes time and unfortunately a grip of cash. John’s friends are true blue and continue to have these fundraisers to aid in his recovery. It really is absolutely moving. This one will have a 50/50 raffle and a portion of the daily sales will be donated to John. Syco Billy’s will be playing from 5-6pm but there will be music starting at 2pm until closing. So far they have Meziere & Ivie Band, The Flextones, Renee Hill Band NW...

Read More

A slide toward extinction

by Helen Caswell As decisions about new logging operations are being considered in the state, conservationists are checking in on an infamous little owl. They’re finding that the news isn’t good. The northern spotted owl is in greater peril than ever, and evidence suggests that it will take a huge amount of will – public and legislative – and require significant changes in Oregon’s timber industry, to prevent the species from perishing. The owl in question is a nocturnal raptor that lives in the old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest, from northern California to lower British Columbia. It...

Read More

Roberta and the Deep Blue Sea

by Jay Gipson-King The Verona Studio dives deep to uncover an unlikely romance between two broken people in Danny and the Deep Blue Sea, directed by Jeff Sanders. Written by John Patrick Shanley, Danny and the Deep Blue Sea brings together Danny, a young man with anger issues, and Roberta, a woman with a troubling self-image. Danny believes he has killed a man; Roberta has committed an unspeakable act. They both suffer from unbearable guilt, and this burden—and the hope of solace—brings them together. The play is named for Danny, but it is Roberta’s story. It is she who initiates the action...

Read More

Review: Nice and Loud -Salem Writes

Salem writer Lois Rosen has recently published her second book of poetry – Nice and Loud.  She will read her poetry Thursday March 31st at 7pm at Frozation Nation, 155 Liberty St NE, Salem, free to the public. ~Editor Review: Nice and Loud Vere McCarty Nearly every page in Lois Rosen’s new book of poems involves the sense of taste.  The opening piece “Cake and Bread” expresses wonderment for a feeling of safety. Night after night, Papa returned home unbeaten, white boxes gleaming from the bakery, bags brimming with challah, frozen-dough rolls, seeded rye. He repeated, “Never save on your stomach.” Reading this poem takes me back to my grandma bringing hot rolls out of the woodstove, and her lingering relief that her boys had come home from the war to enjoy them. Treats like honey cake and Lipton’s with grape jelly grace these poems, and also seal meat and blubber, the orange tang of marigolds, Hungarian brandy (in a summer camp that is nicer and louder than Alan Sherman’s), Wonder Bread, tapioca, even a bouquet that in a Dellwood Dairy milk bottle graced our coffee table. There is music too, from the Temptations’ shoo be doop to a Kuwaiti drummer singing about a woman lovely as a garden. The drumskin becomes a moon white and far away. The keywords “nice and loud” appear in a riff called “Strudel”...

Read More

The Business, Poems by Stephanie Lenox -Review by Vere McCarty

It is a confident title for a book of poems, but The Business put me off at first.  Why would I read poetry if not to get my mind off the stress of business? Stephanie Lenox explains that the idea came from her co-office-worker Carla, who whispered, “You’re a writer, right? You should write about this. ” “Working in an office,” she admits, “is not particularly poetic. But I wrote this book because I wanted to address that part of our lives that few poems touch. I believe that poetry can be a way to celebrate and mourn the hours of our lives we give, out of necessity, to others in order to survive.” Agro-business is also represented.  The title poem goes right down to the farm, where my own work life began. The tractor in the field does not take things personally. It is not affronted by the way wheat bends before it, all that luscious weakness. There is no mind, just a motor, a servitude of parts churning politely together.  The oily smoke is only smoke, no more. I still think my uncle’s old combine hated me.  But the writing feels needed, like knocking off for a mid-morning break. The farm is hard on the body and easy on the spirit.  The office, for me, is just the opposite.  Nice people, benefits, a comfy chair – why should it...

Read More

FREAKY FRIDAY FOOD TRUCK FRENZY FUNDRAISER, UPCYCLE OREGON

Friday May 13th: FREAKY FRIDAY FOOD TRUCK FRENZY FUNDRAISER On Friday the 13th come down to Willamette Humane Society for our Freaky Friday Food Truck Frenzy Fundraiser, to help pets who are down on their luck and waiting for new homes! There will be food trucks a-plenty, and beer from Santiam Brewing Co. for sale! All tips will be donated to help pets in the shelter. Willamette Humane Society will be open late until 9 pm on May 13th for adoptions and purchases in Davenport’s Den! Well behaved, on-leash dogs are welcome at the event! Supervised off-leash dog playgroups will be available. Need a babysitter? Register your kids...

Read More

sw-house-ad-for-web-donatepdffinal

sw-house-ad-for-web-donatepdffinal