Chris Hoy, a tall man with a direct, intelligent, warm gaze, spends much of his weekends working to brighten and fortify his community. He might be found gathering trash with NESCA neighbors in a Park-Ride zone; he might be planting saplings with Friends of Frees in McKay Park for future generations of families to enjoy. He might be reviewing the thick packet of material provided to city councilors by City of Salem staff to prepare for a Monday night City Council meeting

“I believe public service is one of the greatest things we can do,” Hoy says. A fourth-generation Oregonian, he grew up in a small coastal town working in his family’s fish processing plant. He knew from an early age that he wanted to be involved in public service.

“And that’s quite odd,” he says, “since my dad was a small business owner that he took over from his dad. He asked me one day when I was about 16 whether I wanted to take over the family business someday. I told him, ‘No thanks, I want to go to college and work for the public.’ I have no idea where that came from. But it’s always been there.”

Hoy, Chief Deputy of the Clackamas County Sheriffs Office, was elected in the March 17 special election to fill the Ward 6 seat vacated by Daniel Benjamin.  Because he assumed the Ward 6 position midway through the 4-year term, he will be up for re-election in next spring’s primary on May 15, 2018.

Ward 6, which is located primarily east of I-5 and extends past Lancaster to Cordon Rd., has one of the lowest voter turnouts in the city and has been considered underrepresented on city council for years. Hoy is already working to change that, by speaking frequently to residents about empty seats on the city’s boards and commissions and encouraging people to apply for them.

He notes, however, that “most of my neighbors, like me, work full time and are focused on making a living and living their busy lives” and understands that civic involvement “is a luxury for which some just don’t have the time.” Additionally, he lives in the most diverse ward in Salem and understands that, “given the current national political climate, people who immigrated here are, understandably, often very reluctant to get involved with the government.”

Hoy has lived in Salem for about 18 years, including the years he attended Willamette University, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with an English Minor. He says Salem is his permanent home.

“Salem has all the trappings of a city but has that smallish town feel. [It] has the best of both worlds. And its proximity to Portland and Seattle provides for convenient access to things you can’t find here.”

He considers Salem “Oregon’s best-kept secret. People associate us with state government, but they don’t realize what a thriving downtown we have. We have great restaurants. We have great community theater. We have great schools. And we have great people.”

“I love it here,” he says, “and can’t imagine living anywhere else.”

In his limited free time, Hoy, who has never-married Hoy bicycles and cooks and walks two rescued Labrador retrievers, Maggie and Gracie. He is also a photographer (see his work at capturedimaginings.com) of people and Oregon places. “My photographs are a window into my view of the world,” he says. “Everything is not as it seems at first glance.”

Hoy’s platform brought attention to the specific needs of his Ward 6 neighbors and Salem’s underserved. He is passionate about facilitating bus service on nights and weekends and about bringing sidewalks and safety to all of Salem’s neighborhood. He is also committed to addressing the issue of homelessness in a compassionate and effective way, saying, “We are all impacted by this growing situation, and we need to bring the collective wisdom and energy of the city and the community together to solve this.”

When City Council considered a “sit-lie” ordinance in September, Hoy wrote a much-circulated Facebook post that read, in part, “I have rarely seen a positive outcome in my almost 29-year law enforcement career when we criminalize the human condition. When your circumstance makes your existence a crime, there are no good outcomes.” Hoy understood that the goal of the ordinance was not to arrest people, “however, that will be the inevitable outcome. People will be arrested, they will often not appear in court, they will get arrested again and the cycle will repeat. Over and over and over. And I know very well that once you get involved in the criminal justice system it is very difficult to get out.”

The post concluded, “Criminalizing the human condition is not who we are.”

Hoy’s job with Clackamas County involves administering a $44 million public safety budget, but his face lights up with enthusiasm when he discusses the direct person-to-person work that demonstrably improves lives. He calls it, “one of the most rewarding parts of my career.”

In addition to engaging with survivors of domestic violence in a Women’s Empowerment Project, Hoy is involved in a program for Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment.

“We work primarily with heroin and meth addicts who have been convicted of felonies,” he says. “These folks have failed pretty much every aspect of life and the criminal justice system, and are basically at rock bottom. It brings me pure joy to watch someone regain their sense of self, watch their thinking change and see them emerge from a hellish world of addiction to become productive members of the community… It’s remarkably rewarding. “

Whether at work, attending community meetings or taking photographs of Oregon’s beauty, Hoy says, “I am committed to making a difference.”

Chris Hoy, a tall man with a direct, intelligent, warm gaze, spends much of his weekends working to brighten and fortify his community. He might be found gathering trash with NESCA neighbors in a Park-Ride zone; he might be planting saplings with Friends of Frees in McKay Park for future generations of families to enjoy. He might be reviewing the thick packet of material provided to city councilors by City of Salem staff to prepare for a Monday night City Council meeting

“I believe public service is one of the greatest things we can do,” Hoy says. A fourth-generation Oregonian, he grew up in a small coastal town working in his family’s fish processing plant. He knew from an early age that he wanted to be involved in public service.

“And that’s quite odd,” he says, “since my dad was a small business owner that he took over from his dad. He asked me one day when I was about 16 whether I wanted to take over the family business someday. I told him, ‘No thanks, I want to go to college and work for the public.’ I have no idea where that came from. But it’s always been there.”

Hoy, Chief Deputy of the Clackamas County Sheriffs Office, was elected in the March 17 special election to fill the Ward 6 seat vacated by Daniel Benjamin.  Because he assumed the Ward 6 position midway through the 4-year term, he will be up for re-election in next spring’s primary on May 15, 2018.

Ward 6, which is located primarily east of I-5 and extends past Lancaster to Cordon Rd., has one of the lowest voter turnouts in the city and has been considered underrepresented on city council for years. Hoy is already working to change that, by speaking frequently to residents about empty seats on the city’s boards and commissions and encouraging people to apply for them.

He notes, however, that “most of my neighbors, like me, work full time and are focused on making a living and living their busy lives” and understands that civic involvement “is a luxury for which some just don’t have the time.” Additionally, he lives in the most diverse ward in Salem and understands that, “given the current national political climate, people who immigrated here are, understandably, often very reluctant to get involved with the government.”

Hoy has lived in Salem for about 18 years, including the years he attended Willamette University, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with an English Minor. He says Salem is his permanent home.

“Salem has all the trappings of a city but has that smallish town feel. [It] has the best of both worlds. And its proximity to Portland and Seattle provides for convenient access to things you can’t find here.”

He considers Salem “Oregon’s best-kept secret. People associate us with state government, but they don’t realize what a thriving downtown we have. We have great restaurants. We have great community theater. We have great schools. And we have great people.”

“I love it here,” he says, “and can’t imagine living anywhere else.”

In his limited free time, Hoy, who has never-married Hoy bicycles and cooks and walks two rescued Labrador retrievers, Maggie and Gracie. He is also a photographer (see his work at capturedimaginings.com) of people and Oregon places. “My photographs are a window into my view of the world,” he says. “Everything is not as it seems at first glance.”

Hoy’s platform brought attention to the specific needs of his Ward 6 neighbors and Salem’s underserved. He is passionate about facilitating bus service on nights and weekends and about bringing sidewalks and safety to all of Salem’s neighborhood. He is also committed to addressing the issue of homelessness in a compassionate and effective way, saying, “We are all impacted by this growing situation, and we need to bring the collective wisdom and energy of the city and the community together to solve this.”

When City Council considered a “sit-lie” ordinance in September, Hoy wrote a much-circulated Facebook post that read, in part, “I have rarely seen a positive outcome in my almost 29-year law enforcement career when we criminalize the human condition. When your circumstance makes your existence a crime, there are no good outcomes.” Hoy understood that the goal of the ordinance was not to arrest people, “however, that will be the inevitable outcome. People will be arrested, they will often not appear in court, they will get arrested again and the cycle will repeat. Over and over and over. And I know very well that once you get involved in the criminal justice system it is very difficult to get out.”

The post concluded, “Criminalizing the human condition is not who we are.”

Hoy’s job with Clackamas County involves administering a $44 million public safety budget, but his face lights up with enthusiasm when he discusses the direct person-to-person work that demonstrably improves lives. He calls it, “one of the most rewarding parts of my career.”

In addition to engaging with survivors of domestic violence in a Women’s Empowerment Project, Hoy is involved in a program for Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment.

“We work primarily with heroin and meth addicts who have been convicted of felonies,” he says. “These folks have failed pretty much every aspect of life and the criminal justice system, and are basically at rock bottom. It brings me pure joy to watch someone regain their sense of self, watch their thinking change and see them emerge from a hellish world of addiction to become productive members of the community… It’s remarkably rewarding. “

Whether at work, attending community meetings or taking photographs of Oregon’s beauty, Hoy says, “I am committed to making a difference.”